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Offline Theos  
#1 Posted : 26 May 2019 08:40:55(UTC)
Giacomo


Posts: 172

Can someone copy paste it here please or on private pm ? The place I am sadly has some IP filters that prevent me for accessing this site.

TA
Offline del115  
#2 Posted : 26 May 2019 09:17:04(UTC)
del115


Posts: 1,403
Location: West Wales

Originally Posted by: Theos Go to Quoted Post
Can someone copy paste it here please or on private pm ? The place I am sadly has some IP filters that prevent me for accessing this site.

TA


Here is the LINK

You will have to subscribe to the Sunday Times (8 weeks @ £1) to access the review.
Whether it is specifically the -R or the 'standard' Trophy is not clear.

Offline del115  
#3 Posted : 26 May 2019 09:19:31(UTC)
del115


Posts: 1,403
Location: West Wales

Originally Posted by: Theos Go to Quoted Post
Can someone copy paste it here please or on private pm ? The place I am sadly has some IP filters that prevent me for accessing this site.

TA


The is the displayed text of a second review article.
Not you still have to register with Sunday Times to get the full article.

CLARKSON: THE RENAULT MÉGANE R.S. TROPHY IS REALLY, REALLY GOOD — BUT OWNING ONE WILL RESULT IN RIDICULE
A car for no-one ... except Clarkson
So, you read that the Renault Mégane R.S. Trophy R recently smashed the Nürburgring record for front-wheel drive production cars and you want a piece of that action? You’re maybe thinking the Trophy R might be a bit too extreme, though — what about the standard R.S. Trophy? Well, there’s one thing you really need to consider before taking the plunge, according to Jeremy Clarkson: ridicule.

According to the Sunday Times Driving car reviewer and Grand Tour host, owning a vehicle like this means you actually know something about cars, and that, he has come to believe, is something to keep quiet.

“For some reason cars cannot and must not be the foundation stones for social intercourse,” he writes in his review, published today. “Admitting that you even know what a Koenigsegg is means there’s something wrong with you. So you have to keep your interest hidden.”

Because of this, he and a group of friends have now taken to meeting to discuss cars in private — “every so often, on a Sunday morning round the back of some farm buildings where no one can see”.

These people would appreciate the R.S. Trophy’s four-wheel steering, engine note “loud enough to scare dogs” and lunacy derived from strapping a turbocharger that must be “the size of a wheelie bin” to the 1.8-litre engine, and getting 296hp from it.

They might also be prepared to accept the suspension, which Clarkson says is so stiff that the ride is less comfortable than “falling down the stairs, being waterboarded, cutting your arm off with a saw — the list is endless.” And they’d surely appreciate the materials used inside, which the reviewer says are on a par with those found in a Golf R.

What they won’t accept, though, is the Renault Mégane badge: “Thanks to a brilliant Alan Partridge scene years ago, the Mégane is seen by people who meet behind farm buildings as a coma with windscreen wipers. Two tons of solid yawn.”

So it’s not a car for people who don’t like cars, and it’s not a car for petrolheads, reckons Clarkson. Which is a shame, he says, because he thought it was really, really good. “When you take this car by the scruff of the neck it’s a riot of colour and sound and terror. I’ve never taken LSD on the world’s fastest rollercoaster, except that now I sort of have.”

Read Jeremy Clarkson’s review of the Renault Mégane R.S. Trophy in full at The Sunday Times website.
Offline slaks  
#4 Posted : 06 June 2019 21:07:40(UTC)
slaks


Posts: 11

Jeremy Clarkson

Sunday Times, The. 05/26/2019, p56,57-56,57. 1.
Let them laugh: it's a lunatic in disguise


Quite often, when I sit down at a party, the person next to me will turn and say sternly: "You're not going to talk about cars, are you?" It's odd. When they find they've been seated next to a merchant banker, they don't say: "You're not going to talk about merchant banking, are you?" This is because they'd be happy to spend the evening talking about merchant banking. Or golf. Or weeping sores. Or the joys of animal cruelty. Or anything. Just not cars.

I have a friend called Charlie who likes horses.And because no one has ever said to him,"You're not going to talk about horses, are you?", he does. Constantly. He talks about the 3.20 at Lingfield and someone whose pet was faster than someone else's pet in the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. And people lap it up. They laugh and they joke right up to the moment when I ask if anyone's seen the new Koenigsegg, and then it's as if a townie has walked into a country pub on Dartmoor. The silence is immediate.

Even people round the table who I know for a fact like cars come over all Judas Iscariot and deny it. Because for some reason cars cannot and must not be the foundation stones for social intercourse. Admitting that you even know what a Koenigsegg is means there's something wrong with you. So you have to keep your interest hidden.You have to behave like a Freemason.

All of which brings me to a club that's just started near where I live. As it's for people who like cars, I shall not tell you its name or where we meet. But meet we do, every so often, on a Sunday morning round the back of some farm buildings where no one can see.

And it's weird. I see people there I've known for years, and there's never been a suggestion they have any petrol in their arterial route map. I've seen them listening to Charlie rambling on about horses and merchant bankers droning on about merchant banking, and not once have they even suggested, quietly, that they have a collection of Astons that would fill six postcodes and a Bugatti Royale in the barn.

There are also people there that you know. Household names. People who've said in interviews that they like Jane Austen novels and flower arranging and saving shrews in Borneo.Yet there they are, getting out of a bloody Daytona.Which they've never mentioned at all. Because it would be more socially acceptable to say, "Yes. I traffic in human slaves."

It's liberating.We stand there in the cold and the rain and, hidden from the world, we talk about transaxles and camber and aluminium, and there's no shame. No one tells us to shut up. No one calls us bores or climate-change deniers or murderers. I guess that is what life must be like for Conservatives.

All of which brings me to the new Renault Mégane RS Trophy. This is not a car that would go down well with ordinary people. It's yellow. Very yellow. Yellower than a posh person's Sunday morning drinks-party trousers. And it's loud enough to scare dogs when you start it up. Muggles, then, would hate this car.

And, because it's a Mégane, petrolheads will hate it too. Thanks to a brilliant Alan Partridge scene years ago, the Mégane is seen by people who meet behind farm buildings as a coma with windscreen wipers. Two tons of solid yawn. Nick Clegg with a boot. We don't want one and that's that.

The problem, however, is that it's really, really good. The bald figures don't seem that impressive. It has a 1.8-litre engine, which is small. So to get it to cough up 296 horsepower, it must have a turbocharger the size of a wheelie bin.Which means lag and torque steer and all sorts of general madness. Remember the lunacy of early turbo cars from Saab and Porsche and BMW? That.

Renault may bang on about Formula One-style ball-bearing technology, but there's no getting round the fact that it is squeezing a quart from a pint pot.And there's also no getting round the fact that the Trophy is no faster in a straight line than the much more sober Golf R. The Golf is more comfortable than the Renault too. But then a lot of things are more comfortable than the Renault: falling down the stairs, being waterboarded, cutting your arm of f with a saw — the list is endless. It's so bouncy, in fact, that around London I used my own Range Rover instead.

Out of London, though, it's different, because when you take this car by the scruf f of the neck it's a riot of colour and sound and terror. I've never taken LSD on the world's fastest rollercoaster, except that now I sort of have. Four-wheel steering means it doesn't go round corners in the conventional sense. It darts. Thanks to that rock-hard suspension and chassis stiffness, it turns like a pigeon.

And have you tried to shoot a pigeon? Well, you can't, for two reasons. One, it's now illegal, and two, these airborne rats can dodge lead. The Mégane could too. If I were in the special forces, I'd go into battle in one of these things.

Of course, Renault has made quite a few exciting hot hatchbacks in the past, but all of them have been let down by a sense that they've been cobbled together from the trays you get in a box of chocolates. And then fitted with all sorts of electronic stuf f rejected by Casio.

This one, though, is different. It feels as though it has been screwed together by someone who doesn't have a Disque Bleu clamped between his teeth.And the materials feel more than a thousandth of a millimetre thick. Using touch alone, you'd swear you were in a Golf.

And unlike the last hot Mégane, this one has a back seat and the ability to go over speed humps without leaving half its bodywork behind. This is a car, then, you could use every day. Apart from the ride. And you can get around that by buying the standard, non-Trophy model, which saves you a chunk of change as well.

Or, if you want to spend more, you could buy the Alpine, which has the same engine and the same sort of performance. I haven't driven it but my colleague on television, James May, has, and he liked it so much he bought one. This means, of course, it's rubbish.

I'd stick with the full-on Trophy, go for the flappy paddle box rather than the notchy manual and put up with the spinal damage.

And the ridicule, because, with all its lights and its big exhausts, this is a car that screams: "I am interested in cars."And that's like walking down the street in a fluorescent T-shirt that says: "I'm going to vote Conservative." ? n The Clarksometer Renault Mégane RS Trophy 1,874mm 4,372mm Fuel / CO2 34.4mpg / 183g/km Engine 4-cylinder injection, turbocharged Weight 1,419kg Power 296bhp @ 6000rpm Price £31,835 Torque 295 lb ft @ 3200rpm Release date On sale now Acceleration 0-62mph: 5.7sec Jeremy's rating Top speed 162mph CONTACT US Write to us at driving@sunday-times.

co.uk, or Driving, The Sunday Times, 1 London Bridge Street, London SE1 9GF DRIVING.CO.UK For daily news, reviews, videos, buying guides and advice
Offline Giacomo  
#5 Posted : 07 June 2019 16:12:05(UTC)
Giacomo


Posts: 172

Nice read !
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